DITA, Web applications

Mining history

This week in DITA we looked at ‘data mining’ and in particular, two projects (the Old Bailey Online project and Asymmetrical Encouters research project) that provided examples of and facilitated this process.

For our purposes of research in the humanities and social sciences (as a brief definition), data mining refers to the “extraction of information from a body of texts and/or their metadata in order to ask research questions that may or may not be quantitative” (Priego 2014). Continue reading

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Databases, DITA, Web applications

Analyse this!

The more reading and research  I do for both DITA and LISF, the more I keep bumping into this one term that seems to connect everything together and grounds a lot my critical thinking; context.

Who was this written for? What did they mean by this? How does this relate to the modern world? Is this relevant to our needs?

We met again last week in DITA Session 07 – Text Analysis.

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Databases, DITA, Information retrieval, Web applications

An alternative lifestyle

Altmetrics (alternative metrics), are essentially alternative methods of measuring scholarly impact. Traditionally, this has been based on the number of times an article or paper is cited in other articles. With the rise of the digital age and Web 2.0, ideas and scholarly thought is being discussed, interacted with and disseminated in many new ways, across multiple platforms. This begs the question, why shouldn’t this content be taken into account when measuring scholarly impact?

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Databases, DITA, Web applications

My two-pence worth

Last week I tweeted a link to an article which had mined and analysed data sets from Twitter, focusing on the Gamer Gate hashtag (#GamerGate). It took a sample of tweets that used #GamerGate and tried to analyse the authors sentiments; whether the tweet was negative, neutral or positive.

If you haven’t heard of or been following the #GamerGate controversy, there are excellent summaries here and here. Continue reading

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DITA, Web applications

Share and share alike

It’s very easy to take things for granted. Once you become used to something working or being there, you rarely stop and question it. How exactly does this service produce such slick and polished results? What’s the mechanism that keeps this thing running?

This was the case with APIs, a term I had not heard before until recently but had unwittingly been engaged with many times before. Continue reading

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Blogging, DITA, Labelling

Our names define us, and our blogs!

The names we assign plants, countries, cooking utensils, buildings, people, ourselves (pretty much anything) have wider cultural repercussions beyond the convenience of being able to recall the name of an object or person and use it as reference in conversation.

For example, Kate is the name of my girlfriend. When I’m at a party and I introduce Kate to people I know, I don’t particularly enjoy saying, Continue reading

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